Hairdressing Industry And Its Governing Bodies

The hairdressing industry as various governing bodies intended to protect the client and the hair salon

NHF
National Hairdressers’ Federation (NHF) provides salon members with help and information for the hair industry currently has over 6,000 members, which includes small and medium salons that include hair and beauty salons, and Independent Chair Renters.

The NHF works on behalf of its members to raise the professionalism and commitment to the hair and beauty industry. Members have access to a range of benefits, including services, products, advice and information that help them to develop their business, including access to a free legal helpline, salon insurance, discounted rates on PPL Licences. It helps its member through representation legal and employement advice.

If a salon displays it’s a member of the NHF this does mean it better than another salon down the road. Although it should be noted that the hair salon itself takes its business and contractual arrangements seriously.

AHT
Association of Hairdressers and Therapists, founded in 1963 by a group of hairdressing teachers as a like minded national network of specialists who exchange good practice and support. This organisations members are more made up from the educational sector of hairdressing. Ranging from lecturers, teachers and assessors who hold relevent teaching qualifications or are working toward achieving those qualifications. The AHT holds National Training initatives, events and specialist demonstrations across its network.

HABIA
In 1986, the Hairdressing Training Board (HTB) was formed with the objective of working with employers, educators and government to design and implement training and education programmes for the hairdressing industry.

Habia is the government appointed standards setting body for hair, beauty, nails, spa therapy, barbering and African type hair, and creates the standards that form the basis of all qualifications including NVQs, SVQs, Apprenticeships, Diplomas and Foundation degrees, as well as industry codes of practice.

In 1997, HTB, HTB Scotland, and the Beauty Industry Authority (BIA) formed the Hairdressing and Beauty Industry Authority (HABIA) to include the beauty therapy industry within its remit. Habia was formally launched by Dr Kim Howells, then Minister for Lifelong Learning, at that year’s Salon International exhibition.

By 2001, the organisation was being referred to by its initials, HABIA, and by the end of 2004 the decision was made to officially make the company name Habia. By this time, nail services and spa therapy had been added to Habia’s remit.

Habia was officially recognised by the government as a National Training Organisation (NTO) until these were abolished in 2001. Currently, Habia is recognised by the government as the Standards Setting Body for the hair, beauty, nails and spa sectors (including barbering and African Caribbean hair). The core responsibilities for Standards Setting Bodies include sector research and information, national occupational standards, qualifications strategy and learning frameworks. A central point of contact for information, Habia provides guidance on careers, business development, legislation, salon safety and equal opportunities, and is responsible to government on industry issues such as education and skills.

Habia raises the profile of its industries through the press and media, and is the first port of call for news organisations and broadcasters on news items and background information.

Habia also delivers solutions direct to:
salons  to help them understand complex legislation such as health & safety and employment law, improve client retention and raise business performance;
employees  to gain the skills that employers need to stay up to date with client demand and the latest techniques, equipment and products, as well as where to go to access learning and suitable qualifications;
trainers – to deliver qualifications with training support manuals, and to create successful teaching programmes including induction and initial assessment;
learners – by offering books and teaching guides directly related to their studies, and by providing advice on career paths and qualifications.

HABIA is very similar to the NHF in its support for salons and individuals.

The Future For Hair Associations
State registration is looking like a possible requirement for hair salons moving forward to promote best practice and tidy up the industry